Tecnología

apertus° AXIOM – The first Open Source Cinema Camera [32c3]


Publicado el 28 dic. 2015

apertus° AXIOM
The first Open Source Cinema Camera

AXIOM is the first professional, extendable, affordable and modular cinema camera platform based on Free (“libre”) Software, Open Design, Open Hardware, transparent development processes and extensive documentation. The community project establishes an ecosystem that offers a sustainable basis for a broad spectrum of imaging applications and empowers enthusiasts, videographers as well as developers in the technology and creative industry sectors.

Since 2006 the apertus° community has been developing open tools to tackle demands of professionals working in contemporary video and film production. The community extends from renowned Directors of Photography in prominent Hollywood studios to emerging independent filmmakers, developers, artists and researchers all working from different locations around the world. AXIOM is a very ambitious project, using principles of FLOSS, extended on the whole design, production and software of a professional, modular cinema camera. With AXIOM, our ambition is to free film makers of the artificial limitations introduced through the “closed” products being available.

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➤Speaker: Matthias Tarasiewicz (parasew)
➤EventID: 7355
➤Event: 32th Chaos Communication Congress [32c3] of the Chaos Computer Club [CCC]
➤Location: Congress Centrum Hamburg (CCH); Am Dammtor; Marseiller Straße; 20355 Hamburg; Germany
➤Language: english
➤Begin: Mon, 12/28/2015 16:45:00 +01:00
➤License: CC-by

Help us caption & translate this video!

http://amara.org/v/HbZf/

 

The Rising of the Robot Discovery Channel Science Documentaries 2015 #ROBOT


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BBC DOCUMENTARY 2015 | The Rising of the Robot Discovery Channel Science Documentaries 2015

Publicado el 14 jun. 2015

BBC DOCUMENTARY 2015 | The Rising of the Robot Discovery Channel Full Documentary HD 2015
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A robot is a mechanical or virtual artificial agent, usually an electro-mechanical machine that is guided by a computer program or electronic circuitry. Robots can be autonomous or semi-autonomous and range from humanoids such as Honda’s Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility (ASIMO) and TOSY’s TOSY Ping Pong Playing Robot (TOPIO) to industrial robots, collectively programmed swarm robots, and even microscopic nano robots. By mimicking a lifelike appearance or automating movements, a robot may convey a sense of intelligence or thought of its own.

The branch of technology that deals with the design, construction, operation, and application of robots,[2] as well as computer systems for their control, sensory feedback, and information processing is robotics. These technologies deal with automated machines that can take the place of humans in dangerous environments or manufacturing processes, or resemble humans in appearance, behavior, and/or cognition. Many of today’s robots are inspired by nature contributing to the field of bio-inspired robotics. These robots have also created a newer branch of robotics: Soft robotics.

From the time of ancient civilization there have been many accounts of user-configurable automated devices and even automata resembling animals and humans, designed primarily as entertainment. As mechanical techniques developed through the Industrial age, there appeared more practical applications such as automated machines, remote-control and wireless remote-control.

The word ‘robot’ was first used to denote fictional humanoid in a 1921 play R.U.R. by the Czech writer, Karel Čapek. Electronics evolved into the driving force of development with the advent of the first electronic autonomous robots created by William Grey Walter in Bristol, England in 1948. The first digital and programmable robot was invented by George Devol in 1954 and was named the Unimate. It was sold to General Motors in 1961 where it was used to lift pieces of hot metal from die casting machines at the Inland Fisher Guide Plant in the West Trenton section of Ewing Township, New Jersey.[3]

Robots have replaced humans[4] in the assistance of performing those repetitive and dangerous tasks which humans prefer not to do, or are unable to do due to size limitations, or even those such as in outer space or at the bottom of the sea where humans could not survive the extreme environments.

There are concerns about the increasing use of robots and their role in society. Robots are blamed for rising unemployment as they replace workers in increasing numbers of functions.[5] The use of robots in military combat raises ethical concerns. The possibilities of robot autonomy and potential repercussions have been addressed in fiction and may be a realistic concern in the future.

 

OPEN – lgc skates Israel – short video


http://longboardgirlscrew.com/

Girls
#

OPEN – lgc skates Israel – short video from Longboard Girls Crew on Vimeo.

Cellular Exploitation on a Global Scale: The Rise and Fall of the Control Protocol


Publicado el 11/8/2014

“Since the introduction of the smart phone, the issue of control has entered a new paradigm. Manufacturers and enterprises have claimed control over not just how your phone operates, but the software that is allowed to run on it. However, few people know that Service Providers have a hidden and pervasive level of control over your device. These hidden controls can be found in over 2 billion cellular devices worldwide. Organizations have been quietly deploying these controls in smart phones, feature phones, basebands, laptops, embedded M2M devices, and even certain cars. Someone with knowledge of these controls and the right techniques could potentially leverage them for cellular exploitation on a global scale.

We’ve reverse engineered embedded baseband and application space code. We’ve torn apart the Over-the-Air communications and implemented our own code to speak the relevant protocols. Layer by layer, we’ve deconstructed these hidden controls to learn how they work. While performing this work we’ve unearthed subtle flaws in how the communication is handled and implemented. After understanding these flaws, we’ve written proof-of-concept exploits to demonstrate the true risk this software presents to the end user.

In this presentation, we will discuss and disclose how Over-the-Air code execution can be obtained on the major cellular platforms and networks (GSM/CDMA/LTE). Including but not limited to Android, iOS, Blackberry, and Embedded M2M devices. You will come away from this talk armed with detailed insight into these hidden control mechanisms. We will also release open source tools to help assess and protect from the new threats this hidden attack surface presents. These tools will include the ability to dynamically test proprietary system applications and simulate different aspects of a cellular environment.”

BH Cover Photo

BH Cover Photo

Report: UK and US spies have cracked BlackBerry’s BES encryption


http://news.techworld.com/security/3467695/report-uk-and-us-spies-have-cracked-blackberrys-bes-encryption/

By Peter Sayer
Techworld
09 September 2013

The U.S. National Security Agency is able to read messages sent via a corporate BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES), according to a report by German news magazine Der Spiegel. The purpose of this spying is economic or political, and not to counter terrorism, the magazine hints.


The report, published in English on Monday, cites internal documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.


Governments have long demanded that BlackBerry provide access to encrypted messages carried by its email and BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) services, to allow them to monitor for terrorist activity.


BlackBerry has complied in the case of its consumer-grade BlackBerry Internet Service (BIS), notably providing the Indian government with access to consumer messages. Indeed, Der Spiegel cited NSA documents claiming that since 2009, analysts have been able to see and read

[...]

--
Find the best InfoSec talent without breaking your
recruiting budget! Post a Job, $99 for 31 days.
Hot InfoSec Jobs - http://www.hotinfosecjobs.com/

IBM Roadrunner


http://www.lanl.gov/roadrunner/

LANL has always been an early adopter of transformational high performance computing (HPC) technology.  For example, in the 1970s when HPC was scalar; LANL acquired the first Cray-1 vector supercomputer.  When HPC was vector; LANL acquired the first TMC CM-5 massively parallel supercomputer; the first #1 on the TOP500 list.  In the 2000s, HPC was distributed memory; LANL and IBM built Roadrunner, the first hybrid supercomputer and the first supercomputer to attain a sustained petaflop/second.

First Science at Petascale, Results from the Roadrunner Supercomputer

ROADRUNNER

ROADRUNNER

http://www.lanl.gov/roadrunner/rropenscience.shtml

Roadrunner Open Science: important strides taken

Open Science (unclassified work) on Roadrunner, the world’s first petaflop/s computer, resulted in significant breakthroughs in materials, astronomy, and laser plasma science. Presented here are images, movies, and brief explanations of the exciting new work done on Roadrunner by seven Principal Investigators (P.I.s):

IBM Roadrunner

Roadrunner was a supercomputer built by IBM at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, USA. The US$100-million Roadrunner was designed for a peak performance of 1.7 petaflops. It achieved 1.026 petaflops on May 25, 2008 to become the world’s first TOP500 Linpack sustained 1.0 petaflops system.[2][3] It was unique because the computer was built from off the shelf parts, with many novel design features including the first hybrid computer built at the supercomputing scale.

In November 2008, it reached a top performance of 1.456 petaflops, retaining its top spot in the TOP500 list.[4] It was also the fourth-most energy-efficient supercomputer in the world on the Supermicro Green500 list, with an operational rate of 444.94 megaflops per watt of power used. The hybrid Roadrunner design was then reused for several other energy efficient supercomputers.[5] Roadrunner was decommissioned by Los Alamos on March 31, 2013.[6] In its place, Los Alamos uses a supercomputer called Cielo, which was installed in 2010. Cielo is smaller and more energy efficient than Roadrunner, and cost $54 million.[6]

800px-Roadrunner_supercomputer_HiRes

800px-Roadrunner_supercomputer_HiRes

800px-TriBlade

800px-TriBlade

DOCUMENT PDFhttp://sti.cc.gatech.edu/SC07-BOF/06-Borrett.pdf

http://www.ibm.com/news/us/en/2008/06/09/d074803y96972a84.html

http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/24405.wss

IBM & Department of Energy Unveil Petaflop Supercomputer

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Roadrunner

MODERN EDUCATION IN THE CYBERSECURITY FIELD


VIAWe Use Word to Save the World | Kaspersky Lab Official Blog | The Official Blog from Kaspersky Lab covers information to help protect you against viruses, spyware, hackers, spam & other forms of malware.

Sergey Novikov, Head of the Global Research and Analysis Team for EEMEA, Kaspersky Lab, shares his thoughts and experiences regarding modern education in the cybersecurity field. Watch the exclusive interview from the Erevan Students Conference, Kaspersky Academy.

RECOMMENDED READS

CYBERSECURITY FOR THE NEXT GENERATION – HOPES & DREAMS

WHEN’S THE NEXT APOCALYPSE? RSA 2013 CONFERENCE TRENDS

http://blog.kaspersky.com/

http://eugene.kaspersky.com/ (NOTA BENE)

CJDTHITYYJ CTRHTNYJ/.*

Eugene_Kaspersky

Eugene_Kaspersky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES, COMMENT AND BUZZ FROM EUGENE KASPERSKY – OFFICIAL BLOG

Twitter LinkedIn YouTube  Google Plus Instagram Flickr Pinterest RSS

 

Liberation Technology in Authoritarian Regimes


Program on Liberation Technology

This two day conference will examine the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to expand freedom and generate more pluralistic flows of ideas and information in authoritarian contexts. Through presentation of papers and panel sessions, three key themes will be explored:

  • How individuals in authoritarian countries are using liberation technologies (particularly the internet and mobile phones) to expand pluralism and freedom.
  • How authoritarian states are censoring, constraining, monitoring, and punishing the use of ICT for that purpose.
  • How citizens and groups can circumvent authoritarian censorship and control of these technologies.

Discussion will focus on these challenges generally and also specific developments in countries such as China, Iran, Cuba, Burma, and North Korea, as well as Russia and selected Arab authoritarian regimes.

The conference is sponsored by the Program on Liberation Technology at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at Stanford, in cooperation with the Hoover Institution.

 

DOWNLOAD: PDF: http://iis-db.stanford.edu/evnts/6349/MacKinnon_Libtech.pdf

Networked Authoritarianism in China and Beyond:
Implications for global Internet freedom

DOWNLOAD: PDF: http://iis-db.stanford.edu/evnts/6349/2010-10_Nicole_Wong_Stanford_Liberation_Technology.pdf

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Hacksperger’s DOCUMENT: Spy Satelite, permanent drone. Hacker Satellite /\


spy satellite (officially referred to as a reconnaissance satellite) is an Earth observation satellite or communications satellite deployed for military or intelligence applications. These are essentially space telescopes that are pointed toward the Earth instead of toward the stars. The first generation type (i.e. Corona [1] [2] and Zenit) took photographs, then ejected canisters ofphotographic film, which would descend to earth.

Corona capsules were retrieved in mid-air as they floated down on parachutes. Later spacecraft had digital imaging systems and uploaded the images via encrypted radio links.

In the United States, most information available is on programs that existed up to 1972. Some information about programs prior to that time is still classified, and a small trickle of information is available on subsequent missions.

A few up-to-date reconnaissance satellite images have been declassified on occasion, or leaked, as in the case of KH-11 photographs which were sent to Jane’s Defence Weekly in 1985.

Hacker Satellite

Hacker Satellite

U.S. Launches New Spy Satellite for Secret National-Security Mission

SOURCE:

A live webcast showing the Delta IV rocket blast into the sky from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Tuesday was blacked out just three minutes after liftoff due to the sensitive nature of the mission, dubbed “NROL-25.”

Specialist publication Spaceflight Now suggested that the NROL-25 satellite was likely rigged with “synthetic aperture radar,” a system capable of observing targets around the globe in daylight and darkness, able to penetrate clouds and identify underground structures such as military bunkers. Though the true capabilities of the satellites are not publicly known due to their top-secret classification, some analysts have claimed that the technology allows the authorities to zoom in on items as small as a human fist from hundreds of miles away.

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-6 at 4:12 p.m. PDT with the classified NROL-25 national security satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office. CREDIT: Pat Corkery, United Launch Alliance

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-6 at 4:12 p.m. PDT with the classified NROL-25 national security satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office.
CREDIT: Pat Corkery, United Launch Alliance

Within the enclosed confines of the massive Space Launch Complex 6 pad at the southern end of California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base, a site once envisioned to fly the space shuttle, a Delta 4 rocket and its classified satellite cargo are undergoing final preps for blastoff next week.

Liftoff is scheduled for Thursday, March 29 on the NROL-25 mission to deploy a hush-hush payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office, the secretive government agency that designs and operates the country’s fleet of orbiting spy satellites.

“Last year we executed the most aggressive launch campaign in over 25 years. We successfully launched six satellites in seven months and this year with the same determination we’re scheduled to launch four more in five months,” Betty Sapp, the NRO’s principal deputy director, said in testimony before Congress on March 8. [Photos: Declassified U.S. Spy Satellites Revealed]

Spy Satellite Gambit 1 KH-7 Credit: U.S. Air ForceGambit 1 KH-7 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

Spy Satellite Gambit 1 KH-7 Credit: U.S. Air ForceGambit 1 KH-7 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

Hexagon KH-9Credit: U.S. Air ForceHexagon KH-9 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

Hexagon KH-9Credit: U.S. Air ForceHexagon KH-9 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

GAMBIT-3 Spy Satellite ExplainedCredit: NROThis image released by the National Reconnaissance Office on Sept. 17, 2011 depicts the GAMBIT-3 spy satellite design, which was used in 54 launches (4 of them failures) for U.S. space surveillance operations between 1966 and 1984

GAMBIT-3 Spy Satellite ExplainedCredit: NROThis image released by the National Reconnaissance Office on Sept. 17, 2011 depicts the GAMBIT-3 spy satellite design, which was used in 54 launches (4 of them failures) for U.S. space surveillance operations between 1966 and 1984

NRO's HEXAGON Spysat Flight ProfileCredit: NROThis graphic from a U.S. National Reconnaissance Office document depicts the flight profile of the massive HEXAGON spy satellite missions that flew from June 1971 to April 1986.

NRO’s HEXAGON Spysat Flight ProfileCredit: NROThis graphic from a U.S. National Reconnaissance Office document depicts the flight profile of the massive HEXAGON spy satellite missions that flew from June 1971 to April 1986.

The National Reconnaissance Office provides satellite imagery for intelligence operations and national defense. Here's a look at the agency's most recent rocket launches.

The National Reconnaissance Office provides satellite imagery for intelligence operations and national defense. Here’s a look at the agency’s most recent rocket launches.

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Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images

Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images

El Ejército de EEUU lanza el mayor satélite espía de la historia

El Ejército estadounidense lanzó el mayor satélite espía del mundo, el NROL-32, informó la United Launch Alliance (ULA) en un comunicado.

El satélite NROL-32 fue enviado con éxito el domingo desde la base aérea militar de Cabo Cañaveral en un cohete Delta IV, señaló ULA, que es una compañía privada que colabora con el departamento de Defensa.

Pocos detalles han trascendido puesto que se trata de una operación secreta, pero se sabe que el NROL-32 es un satélite geoestacionario cuya misión es dar apoyo a la defensa nacional.

El satélite lleva una gran antena colectiva útil para el espionaje electrónico, que lo convierte en el más grande de los satélites puestos en órbita en el espacio.

Se trata del cuarto lanzamiento de un Delta IV Heavy, el cohete con mayor capacidad de carga útil actualmente en servicio.

En un discurso pronunciado en septiembre pasado, el director de la Oficina Nacional de Reconocimiento (NRO), Bruce Carlson, había adelantado que el Delta IV llevaría este otoño “el satélite más grande del mundo”.

La NRO es una de las dieciséis agencias de inteligencia que tiene Estados Unidos y su principal misión es mantenerse al tanto de las últimas tecnologías espaciales y “vigilar desde arriba”.

Según indica en su web, se encarga de diseñar, construir y operar los satélites de reconocimiento estadounidenses y de facilitar los servicios de inteligencia por satélite que necesiten la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA) y el Departamento de Defensa.

“Esta misión ayudará a asegurar que los recursos vitales del NRO sigan reforzando nuestra defensa nacional”, señaló el general de brigada Ed Wilson, a cargo del lanzamiento.

NROL 32

NROL 32

ULA Delta IV launches the NROL-25 military satellite from VAFB

VIA NASA

Aaron Swartz’s FBI File


Computer programmer, Aaron Swartz’s unclassified (but redacted) FBI file was obtained by the watchdog group Fire Dog Lake.

China Suspected of Hacking U.S.


Sophisticated and extensive study on China’s systematic hacking. The report, issued by Mandiant, is pivotal in understanding the lengths and degree to which Chinese hackers are going and how deeply entrenched within the government they are. So far, China denies it all.

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How to #unlock and root a Google Nexus One


Step by step walkthrough to unlocking and rooting your Nexus One. Not for beginners. Got stuck?

Look for help in the forums: forums.androidandme.com

Complete guide: bit.ly/7nVg5o

http://www.tecnologiablog.com/post/1582/como-desbloquear-el-google-nexus-one

http://www.flickr.com/photos/androidandme/sets/72157623192159924/

 


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Tibetan independence activist using open-source nonviolent strategy, technology & training to make change.


lhadon

@lhadon

Tibetan independence activist using open-source nonviolent strategy, technology & training to make change.

New York · https://tibetaction.net/

Lhadon

Lhadon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Attack Vectors on mobile Devices


Mobile devices are everywhere – and they get smarter by the minute (at least they get more functionality by the second). This is a threat to business and a treat for attackers. But are mobile devices safe? This talk looks at physical and psychological aspects of mobile device security, and also covers the various types of software attacks! Tam Hanna gave an overview in his presentation at the DeepSec 2011 security conference.

 


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Cracking GSM by Karsten Nohl


This is the GSM security follow-up to DeepSec 2007. Karsten Nohl explains the state of GSM security by adressing the weaknesses of GSM A5 encryption. Karsten held this talk at the DeepSec conference in 2009. [archivo viejo pero muy interesante]


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Karsten Nohl speaks about GSM: „The popular GSM cell phone standard uses outdated security and provides much less protection than its increasing use in security applications suggests. Our research aims to correct the disconnect between technical facts and security perception by creating a GSM tool that allows users to record and analyze GSM data to see what security features were really implemented by their operator. The talk discusses a GSM debugging tool that consists entirely of open source software and open radio hardware. We will demonstrate how to record and decode GSM calls, even encrypted ones.“

The talk was held at the DeepSec 2010 conference.

 


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