Drone

2013 Drone Summit: Noor and Medea Introduction


We are proud to say that the 2013 CODEPINK Global Drone Summit was a major success, with over 400 attendees, plus thousands watching our livestream and C-SPAN coverage, and over 150 press clips.

Here are some actions you can take:

1. Watch the morning of the summit on C-SPAN, including Dr. Cornel West’s inspiring opening remarks. Check out and share photos from the Summit on Flickr.

2. Get two copies of Medea’s newly updated book, Drone Warfare: Killing By Remote Control. Keep one for yourself and donate the other to your local library!

3. Share this drone fact sheet with friends, colleagues & family. (http://codepink.org/article.php?id=5976)

4. Get a CODEPINK “Drone Free Zone” t-shirt in pink or gray!

5. Keep up to date with the latest drone news on Global Drones Watch.

Thanks again to everyone who turned up, tuned in online, followed on Twitter, and donated to the summit. Our greatest love and appreciation for all you did to make it possible! Now let’s get to work.

Spain Drone

Spain Drone

chip, chip, chip....

chip, chip, chip….

YEMEN TERROR BOSS LEFT BLUEPRINT FOR WAGING JIHAD

via: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/yemen-terror-boss-left-blueprint-waging-jihad

FILE - This image provided by IntelCenter on Dec. 30, 2009, shows a frame made from video released Jan. 23, 2009 by al-Malahim Media Foundation, the media arm of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, with a man identified as Nasser al-Wahishi. In 2012, a year before a communication was intercepted of him discussing the terror plot that prompted early August 2013's sweeping closure of U.S. embassies abroad, al-Qaida's top operative in Yemen laid out his blueprint for how to wage jihad in letters sent to a fellow terrorist. Al-Wahishi provided a step-by-step assessment of what worked and what didn't in Yemen. He urged his fellow jihadist to provide food, clean water and electricity to the people living in the areas they control. He even offers tips for more efficient garbage collection. (AP Photo/IntelCenter, File)

FILE – This image provided by IntelCenter on Dec. 30, 2009, shows a frame made from video released Jan. 23, 2009 by al-Malahim Media Foundation, the media arm of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, with a man identified as Nasser al-Wahishi. In 2012, a year before a communication was intercepted of him discussing the terror plot that prompted early August 2013’s sweeping closure of U.S. embassies abroad, al-Qaida’s top operative in Yemen laid out his blueprint for how to wage jihad in letters sent to a fellow terrorist. Al-Wahishi provided a step-by-step assessment of what worked and what didn’t in Yemen. He urged his fellow jihadist to provide food, clean water and electricity to the people living in the areas they control. He even offers tips for more efficient garbage collection. (AP Photo/IntelCenter, File)

TIMBUKTU, Mali (AP) — A year before he was caught on an intercept discussing the terror plot that prompted this week’s sweeping closure of U.S. embassies abroad, al-Qaida’s top operative in Yemen laid out his blueprint for how to wage jihad in letters sent to a fellow terrorist.

In what reads like a lesson plan, Nasser al-Wahishi provides a step-by-step assessment of what worked and what didn’t in Yemen. But in the never-before-seen correspondence, the man at the center of the latest terror threat barely mentions the extremist methods that have transformed his organization into al-Qaida’s most dangerous branch.

Instead, he urges his counterpart in Africa whose fighters had recently seized northern Mali to make sure the people in the areas they control have electricity and running water. He also offers tips for making garbage collection more efficient.

“Try to win them over through the conveniences of life,” he writes. “It will make them sympathize with us and make them feel that their fate is tied to ours.”

The perhaps surprising hearts-and-minds approach advocated by the 30-something Wahishi, who spent years as Osama bin Laden’s personal secretary, is a sign of a broader shift within al-Qaida. After its failure in Iraq, say experts who were shown the correspondence, the terror network realized that it is not enough to win territory: They must also learn to govern it if they hope to hold it.

“People in the West view al-Qaida as only a terrorist organization, and it certainly is that … but the group itself is much broader, and it is doing much more,” says Gregory Johnsen, a scholar at Princeton University whose book, “The Last Refuge,” charts the rise of al-Qaida in Yemen. “The group sees itself as an organization that can be a government.”

via: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/yemen-terror-boss-left-blueprint-waging-jihad

Drone #CivilWar

Drone #CivilWar

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued certificates for two types of unmanned aircraft for civilian use. The move is expected to lead to the first approved commercial drone operation later this summer.

The two unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are the Scan Eagle X200 and Aero Vironment’s PUMA. They both measure around 4 ½ feet long, weighing less than 55 pounds, and have a wing span of ten and nine feet respectively.

Both the Scan Eagle and the PUMA received “restricted category type certificates”which permit aerial surveillance. Prior to the FAA’s decision, the only way the private sector could operate UAS in US airspace was by obtaining an experimental airworthiness certificate which specifically restricts commercial operations.

The PUMA is expected to support emergency response crews for wildlife surveillance and oil spill monitoring over the Beaufort Sea to the north of Canada and Alaska. The Scan Eagle will be used by a major energy company off the Alaskan Coast to survey ice floes and migrating whales in Arctic oil exploration areas.

The issuing of the certificates is seen as an important step to integrating UAS into US airspace. Both drone operations will meet the requirements of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, which includes a mandate to increase Arctic UAS commercial operations.

Most non-military use of drones in the US has so far been limited to the police and other government agencies. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said in March that drones will soon be used by the NYPD and will become as ubiquitous as security cameras.

Documents released by the American civil Liberties Union (ACLU) via the Freedom of Information Act have revealed that the US Marshals Service has also experimented with the use of drones for domestic surveillance.

Military drones are used extensively by the US Air Force for targeting terrorist suspects in several countries, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Yemen.

The strikes have been highly controversial, as they are ordered without the knowledge or participation of the countries concerned, and are sometimes inaccurate and kill civilians.

Pakistan’s relations with the US have been soured because of drone strikes. Just last month, the new government in Islamabad summoned a top US envoy who was given a letter of protest against drone strikes by the US military.

In May, a Pakistani court ruled that US drone strikes in its tribal regions should be considered war crimes, and that the government should use force to protect its civilians.

#drone

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COVERT DRONE WAR by The Bureau Of Investigative Journalism


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tboi

 

 

 

http://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/

COVERT DRONE WAR

Reaper-Hellfires-Afghanistan-US-Air-Force-950x392

Reaper-Hellfires-Afghanistan-US-Air-Force-950×392

Obama terror drones: CIA tactics in Pakistan include targeting rescuers and funerals

Reaper-general-atomics

Reaper-general-atomics

Hacksperger’s DOCUMENT: Spy Satelite, permanent drone. Hacker Satellite /\


spy satellite (officially referred to as a reconnaissance satellite) is an Earth observation satellite or communications satellite deployed for military or intelligence applications. These are essentially space telescopes that are pointed toward the Earth instead of toward the stars. The first generation type (i.e. Corona [1] [2] and Zenit) took photographs, then ejected canisters ofphotographic film, which would descend to earth.

Corona capsules were retrieved in mid-air as they floated down on parachutes. Later spacecraft had digital imaging systems and uploaded the images via encrypted radio links.

In the United States, most information available is on programs that existed up to 1972. Some information about programs prior to that time is still classified, and a small trickle of information is available on subsequent missions.

A few up-to-date reconnaissance satellite images have been declassified on occasion, or leaked, as in the case of KH-11 photographs which were sent to Jane’s Defence Weekly in 1985.

Hacker Satellite

Hacker Satellite

U.S. Launches New Spy Satellite for Secret National-Security Mission

SOURCE:

A live webcast showing the Delta IV rocket blast into the sky from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Tuesday was blacked out just three minutes after liftoff due to the sensitive nature of the mission, dubbed “NROL-25.”

Specialist publication Spaceflight Now suggested that the NROL-25 satellite was likely rigged with “synthetic aperture radar,” a system capable of observing targets around the globe in daylight and darkness, able to penetrate clouds and identify underground structures such as military bunkers. Though the true capabilities of the satellites are not publicly known due to their top-secret classification, some analysts have claimed that the technology allows the authorities to zoom in on items as small as a human fist from hundreds of miles away.

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-6 at 4:12 p.m. PDT with the classified NROL-25 national security satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office. CREDIT: Pat Corkery, United Launch Alliance

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-6 at 4:12 p.m. PDT with the classified NROL-25 national security satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office.
CREDIT: Pat Corkery, United Launch Alliance

Within the enclosed confines of the massive Space Launch Complex 6 pad at the southern end of California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base, a site once envisioned to fly the space shuttle, a Delta 4 rocket and its classified satellite cargo are undergoing final preps for blastoff next week.

Liftoff is scheduled for Thursday, March 29 on the NROL-25 mission to deploy a hush-hush payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office, the secretive government agency that designs and operates the country’s fleet of orbiting spy satellites.

“Last year we executed the most aggressive launch campaign in over 25 years. We successfully launched six satellites in seven months and this year with the same determination we’re scheduled to launch four more in five months,” Betty Sapp, the NRO’s principal deputy director, said in testimony before Congress on March 8. [Photos: Declassified U.S. Spy Satellites Revealed]

Spy Satellite Gambit 1 KH-7 Credit: U.S. Air ForceGambit 1 KH-7 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

Spy Satellite Gambit 1 KH-7 Credit: U.S. Air ForceGambit 1 KH-7 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

Hexagon KH-9Credit: U.S. Air ForceHexagon KH-9 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

Hexagon KH-9Credit: U.S. Air ForceHexagon KH-9 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.

GAMBIT-3 Spy Satellite ExplainedCredit: NROThis image released by the National Reconnaissance Office on Sept. 17, 2011 depicts the GAMBIT-3 spy satellite design, which was used in 54 launches (4 of them failures) for U.S. space surveillance operations between 1966 and 1984

GAMBIT-3 Spy Satellite ExplainedCredit: NROThis image released by the National Reconnaissance Office on Sept. 17, 2011 depicts the GAMBIT-3 spy satellite design, which was used in 54 launches (4 of them failures) for U.S. space surveillance operations between 1966 and 1984

NRO's HEXAGON Spysat Flight ProfileCredit: NROThis graphic from a U.S. National Reconnaissance Office document depicts the flight profile of the massive HEXAGON spy satellite missions that flew from June 1971 to April 1986.

NRO’s HEXAGON Spysat Flight ProfileCredit: NROThis graphic from a U.S. National Reconnaissance Office document depicts the flight profile of the massive HEXAGON spy satellite missions that flew from June 1971 to April 1986.

The National Reconnaissance Office provides satellite imagery for intelligence operations and national defense. Here's a look at the agency's most recent rocket launches.

The National Reconnaissance Office provides satellite imagery for intelligence operations and national defense. Here’s a look at the agency’s most recent rocket launches.

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Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images

Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images

El Ejército de EEUU lanza el mayor satélite espía de la historia

El Ejército estadounidense lanzó el mayor satélite espía del mundo, el NROL-32, informó la United Launch Alliance (ULA) en un comunicado.

El satélite NROL-32 fue enviado con éxito el domingo desde la base aérea militar de Cabo Cañaveral en un cohete Delta IV, señaló ULA, que es una compañía privada que colabora con el departamento de Defensa.

Pocos detalles han trascendido puesto que se trata de una operación secreta, pero se sabe que el NROL-32 es un satélite geoestacionario cuya misión es dar apoyo a la defensa nacional.

El satélite lleva una gran antena colectiva útil para el espionaje electrónico, que lo convierte en el más grande de los satélites puestos en órbita en el espacio.

Se trata del cuarto lanzamiento de un Delta IV Heavy, el cohete con mayor capacidad de carga útil actualmente en servicio.

En un discurso pronunciado en septiembre pasado, el director de la Oficina Nacional de Reconocimiento (NRO), Bruce Carlson, había adelantado que el Delta IV llevaría este otoño “el satélite más grande del mundo”.

La NRO es una de las dieciséis agencias de inteligencia que tiene Estados Unidos y su principal misión es mantenerse al tanto de las últimas tecnologías espaciales y “vigilar desde arriba”.

Según indica en su web, se encarga de diseñar, construir y operar los satélites de reconocimiento estadounidenses y de facilitar los servicios de inteligencia por satélite que necesiten la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA) y el Departamento de Defensa.

“Esta misión ayudará a asegurar que los recursos vitales del NRO sigan reforzando nuestra defensa nacional”, señaló el general de brigada Ed Wilson, a cargo del lanzamiento.

NROL 32

NROL 32

ULA Delta IV launches the NROL-25 military satellite from VAFB

VIA NASA

US drone debate may affect Australia


The use of drone warfare is being debated in the United States, and just how it plays out may have implications for Australia, Greg Dyett reports. 

A US Predator Drone. (Getty)

A US Predator Drone. (Getty)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Transcript from World News Australia Radio)

A United States Senator claims 4,700 people have been killed by the US unmanned aerial craft, known as drones.

Republican senator Lindsey Graham is a supporter of the drone program, primarily in use by the U-S in Afghanistan and northwest Pakistan.

Senator Graham says while some innocent people have died, the program has managed to kill some senior members of al-Qaeda.

His comments come as President Obama tries to get the architect of the program, John Brennan, confirmed as the new head of the Central Intelligence Agency, and as the United Nations investigates the legality of drone strikes.

Drones have proven to be effective killing machines for the United States.

Under the Obama administration, there’s been an increase in drone strikes which have killed al-Qaeda figures the US says have been plotting attacks against America.

In a recent interview with CNN, President Barack Obama reiterated his previous assurances that the secretive drone program is tightly controlled.

Via: http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1741690/US-drone-debate-may-affect-Australia

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(Transcript from World News Australia Radio)