Hacksperger’s DOCUMENT: Spy Satelite, permanent drone. Hacker Satellite /\


spy satellite (officially referred to as a reconnaissance satellite) is an Earth observation satellite or communications satellite deployed for military or intelligence applications. These are essentially space telescopes that are pointed toward the Earth instead of toward the stars. The first generation type (i.e. Corona [1] [2] and Zenit) took photographs, then ejected canisters ofphotographic film, which would descend to earth.

Corona capsules were retrieved in mid-air as they floated down on parachutes. Later spacecraft had digital imaging systems and uploaded the images via encrypted radio links.

In the United States, most information available is on programs that existed up to 1972. Some information about programs prior to that time is still classified, and a small trickle of information is available on subsequent missions.

A few up-to-date reconnaissance satellite images have been declassified on occasion, or leaked, as in the case of KH-11 photographs which were sent to Jane’s Defence Weekly in 1985.

Hacker Satellite
Hacker Satellite

U.S. Launches New Spy Satellite for Secret National-Security Mission

SOURCE:

A live webcast showing the Delta IV rocket blast into the sky from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Tuesday was blacked out just three minutes after liftoff due to the sensitive nature of the mission, dubbed “NROL-25.”

Specialist publication Spaceflight Now suggested that the NROL-25 satellite was likely rigged with “synthetic aperture radar,” a system capable of observing targets around the globe in daylight and darkness, able to penetrate clouds and identify underground structures such as military bunkers. Though the true capabilities of the satellites are not publicly known due to their top-secret classification, some analysts have claimed that the technology allows the authorities to zoom in on items as small as a human fist from hundreds of miles away.

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-6 at 4:12 p.m. PDT with the classified NROL-25 national security satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office. CREDIT: Pat Corkery, United Launch Alliance
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-6 at 4:12 p.m. PDT with the classified NROL-25 national security satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office.
CREDIT: Pat Corkery, United Launch Alliance

Within the enclosed confines of the massive Space Launch Complex 6 pad at the southern end of California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base, a site once envisioned to fly the space shuttle, a Delta 4 rocket and its classified satellite cargo are undergoing final preps for blastoff next week.

Liftoff is scheduled for Thursday, March 29 on the NROL-25 mission to deploy a hush-hush payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office, the secretive government agency that designs and operates the country’s fleet of orbiting spy satellites.

“Last year we executed the most aggressive launch campaign in over 25 years. We successfully launched six satellites in seven months and this year with the same determination we’re scheduled to launch four more in five months,” Betty Sapp, the NRO’s principal deputy director, said in testimony before Congress on March 8. [Photos: Declassified U.S. Spy Satellites Revealed]

Spy Satellite Gambit 1 KH-7 Credit: U.S. Air ForceGambit 1 KH-7 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.
Spy Satellite Gambit 1 KH-7 Credit: U.S. Air ForceGambit 1 KH-7 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.
Hexagon KH-9Credit: U.S. Air ForceHexagon KH-9 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.
Hexagon KH-9Credit: U.S. Air ForceHexagon KH-9 is one of three formerly classified reconnaissance satellites that went on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, starting Jan. 26, 2012.
GAMBIT-3 Spy Satellite ExplainedCredit: NROThis image released by the National Reconnaissance Office on Sept. 17, 2011 depicts the GAMBIT-3 spy satellite design, which was used in 54 launches (4 of them failures) for U.S. space surveillance operations between 1966 and 1984
GAMBIT-3 Spy Satellite ExplainedCredit: NROThis image released by the National Reconnaissance Office on Sept. 17, 2011 depicts the GAMBIT-3 spy satellite design, which was used in 54 launches (4 of them failures) for U.S. space surveillance operations between 1966 and 1984
NRO's HEXAGON Spysat Flight ProfileCredit: NROThis graphic from a U.S. National Reconnaissance Office document depicts the flight profile of the massive HEXAGON spy satellite missions that flew from June 1971 to April 1986.
NRO’s HEXAGON Spysat Flight ProfileCredit: NROThis graphic from a U.S. National Reconnaissance Office document depicts the flight profile of the massive HEXAGON spy satellite missions that flew from June 1971 to April 1986.
The National Reconnaissance Office provides satellite imagery for intelligence operations and national defense. Here's a look at the agency's most recent rocket launches.
The National Reconnaissance Office provides satellite imagery for intelligence operations and national defense. Here’s a look at the agency’s most recent rocket launches.
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Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images
Secret Spy Satellite Takes Off: Stunning Images

El Ejército de EEUU lanza el mayor satélite espía de la historia

El Ejército estadounidense lanzó el mayor satélite espía del mundo, el NROL-32, informó la United Launch Alliance (ULA) en un comunicado.

El satélite NROL-32 fue enviado con éxito el domingo desde la base aérea militar de Cabo Cañaveral en un cohete Delta IV, señaló ULA, que es una compañía privada que colabora con el departamento de Defensa.

Pocos detalles han trascendido puesto que se trata de una operación secreta, pero se sabe que el NROL-32 es un satélite geoestacionario cuya misión es dar apoyo a la defensa nacional.

El satélite lleva una gran antena colectiva útil para el espionaje electrónico, que lo convierte en el más grande de los satélites puestos en órbita en el espacio.

Se trata del cuarto lanzamiento de un Delta IV Heavy, el cohete con mayor capacidad de carga útil actualmente en servicio.

En un discurso pronunciado en septiembre pasado, el director de la Oficina Nacional de Reconocimiento (NRO), Bruce Carlson, había adelantado que el Delta IV llevaría este otoño “el satélite más grande del mundo”.

La NRO es una de las dieciséis agencias de inteligencia que tiene Estados Unidos y su principal misión es mantenerse al tanto de las últimas tecnologías espaciales y “vigilar desde arriba”.

Según indica en su web, se encarga de diseñar, construir y operar los satélites de reconocimiento estadounidenses y de facilitar los servicios de inteligencia por satélite que necesiten la Agencia Central de Inteligencia (CIA) y el Departamento de Defensa.

“Esta misión ayudará a asegurar que los recursos vitales del NRO sigan reforzando nuestra defensa nacional”, señaló el general de brigada Ed Wilson, a cargo del lanzamiento.

NROL 32
NROL 32

ULA Delta IV launches the NROL-25 military satellite from VAFB

VIA NASA

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